FAQs

If you have a question that isn't covered, feel free to email or DM me on instagram!

What are alcohol inks?

Alcohol ink is the fluid used in professional illustrator markers or stamp pads. Some are bought as refills for markers, while other brands bottle the inks specifically for fluid art.

What kind of paper should I use?

To keep the inks fluid, you need to apply the inks to a non-porous surface. Many alcohol ink artists (myself included) use something called yupo paper, which is not actually paper but a synthetic. You can also use surfaces such as tile or glass. Can you use canvas? THERE ARE NO RULES, but it will absorb the ink faster giving you a different effect. 

I want to try!!! What should I buy?

I experiment with different materials all the time but the things I will never run out of, and what you need to start are: alcohol inks, isopropyl alcohol (90% or higher), yupo paper (or another nonporous surface), pipettes, medicine cups for mixing. Everything else depends on what you’re trying to do.

What do you use to push around the ink?

A lot. Straws (I have quite a collection of different widths but my faves are the classic bendy ones), compressed air (via an airbrush or canister), hairdryer, heat gun, my mouth!

What do you use to seal the paintings?

Unless otherwise noted, all alcohol ink paintings are sealed with Krylon Kamar Varnish or Krylon Triple Thick followed by Krylon UV resistant coating. Slight color shifting may happen in the sealing process.

Do you take commissions?

Not at this time. If you have an extra special project that you think would specifically interest me, shoot me an email. 

How and when will my piece ship?

All pieces (unless mounted) will ship flat in a no-crush envelope reinforced with additional chipboard. Pieces will ship within one week of order being placed.

How should I display my piece?

I suggest all pieces be put behind museum quality glass with UV protection. This will not only reduce glare on your piece but it will add an additional layer of protection against color fading over time. These pieces really come to life in natural light but the sun leaves artwork prone to fading, so I choose to add this additional layer of protection. (Pieces are protected with UV varnish, but you can never be too safe!)